My servant and the stranger Astensia is an RPG-Maker dungeon-crawler where you rebuild a village at the whims of the RNG gods.


At-a-glance


(Adult) Content?
(FxM) Sexual content.

Censorship?
Mosaic’d genitalia.

Hours of Game-play?
Four or more hours.

Modding Support?
No.

Patch Available?
No, not necessary.



Foreword

Attention!

This article is pending review. It is either incomplete, out-of-date, or I feel the need to disclaim my shame for a something I’m not proud of.

Gameplay

. . . in a nutshell

I need to make some revisions.

out the shell. . .

This title’s game-play reminds me of dungeon crawler-eske games. Every time you move, enemies move too. With that in mind, you want to try to move in ways that will prevent you from being surrounded (and mauled) by multiple enemies at once. In crowded rooms, your moves will count. As you move-about, you also regenerate lost HP. Through-out dungeons, you will find gold and loot (conveniently) left on the floor. Your backpack space is limited, so you find yourself micromanaging your inventory quite a bit. The goal of the game is to bring back loads of loot (to repair a village), so try to hang-on to high-value items.

Just remember, it’s better to live to keep your loot than to die with it.

You have to clear the first ten floors (of the “Little Mysterious Dungeon”) before you are allowed to progress in the game. If you die (from bad RNG), then tough luck. You’re just gonna have to try your. . . luck again. I beat the first set of dungeon floors, and then I got about eleven floors down. It took me a while, and I got decked-out in some sweet gear. I got pretty lucky with the randomized loot and dungeons, so it was a very smooth run. Then the game crashed and I lost all of my progress. . . bummer.

Make sure that you save your game regularly.

The dungeons are randomized. From enemies, loot to lay-outs, everything is randomized. This makes for a lot of variety, but it also makes for countless moments where you just die and lose all your progress because the game spawned multiple “spawn traps” in front of you. There’s plenty of un-fun enemies, which strip the player of control and eat your inventory. If you don’t make it far-enough into the dungeons, when you die, you gain absolutely nothing for your trouble.

Any loot you sell can be used to build buildings in a village. . . which to my knowledge, do nothing. I couldn’t even figure out how to enter them. For five hours of game-play, that’s a disappointing reward.

Story

You play as an unnamed protagonist. He has no “vanilla” name, so I named hime Xanos. I had just watched a MTG trailer, which depicted a god named “Xanagos”. Wait, back on track. . .

So the game starts with the “best king” (who turns out to be the Beast King) calling for Xanos. He meets a (cat) lady named Coco, who offers her assistance. The Beast King tells Xanos to “restore” a village from a demon attack (I think). As it turns out, the beasts (subjects of the Beast King) are at war with the Demon Tribe, and the village is a total wreck.
After settling in a dilapidated house, Coco reveals that she has been Xanos’ servant since childhood. Her plan is to go to a nearby “mysterious dungeon” to claim/sell loot (to rebuild the village).

And what she means by that is you go and explore said dungeon. Afterwards, Xanos meets up with Milk, another (cat) girl. As it turns out, she’s Xanos’ fiance. She convinced her father to permit her to join Xanos and his village buildin’ shenanagens. She also helps him sell off any loot he might bring back from dungeons, so she’s handy. As you enter/exit the dungeons, you will be greeted by short exposition scenes between Coco and Milk.

Visuals

The sprites of this title are nothing special. Most of what you’ll see are goof ol’ default RPG-Maker sprites. The arrangement of said sprites is also nothing remarkable. The actual H-content is very decently drawn, but heavily censored. In my books, censorship is a big no-no. But if you’re okay with censorship, then you’ll find a good gallery full of short (forced) scenes and pictures. There are twelve scenes. The moment I booted the game, the whole gallery was unlocked. . . so yay for not working for it. . . ?

The Goods

The artwork is consistantly styled and quality. There are ten base images, with forty images total. Expect basic female nudity.

Verdict

For the price and content, I don’t recommend purchasing this title for more than a few dollars. The game-play while fun at first, is quick to become monotonous. The adult-content is already unlocked from the get-go (perhaps a bug. . . ?) and the in-game adult content takes ages to unlock (assuming it exists). At ten USD, this is an awful buy.